5 Dental Myths That You Shouldn’t Believe

frustrated womanThere are plenty of places to get oral health advice — our dental office in Lawrenceville, friends or family members, and perhaps even the internet. But not all dental advice is created equal. In fact, there are several tips that we’ve heard that are just not true, some of which can actually be harmful to your oral health. This month we take a look at some of the common dental myths that you shouldn’t believe, let alone try.

  • Chewing Gum or Using Mouthwash is Just as Good as Brushing

Even though chewing a piece of gum or taking a quick swish of mouthwash can quickly freshen breath, they’re not solid replacements for proper brushing and flossing. If you can’t brush right away, let’s say after eating at a restaurant, go ahead and chew some gum (make sure it’s sugar-free!) or rinse with mouthwash. But don’t go too long without brushing your teeth with a fluoride toothpaste or flossing. You should brush twice and floss once daily.

  • Putting Aspirin on a Toothache Can Relieve Pain

This myth is especially concerning for your dentist in Lawrenceville. It started as an old wives tale that promised easy and quick toothache relief. But the truth is, chewing or placing an aspirin tablet on your gums can cause damage. Since aspirin is acidic it can easily burn the gums and make the pain worse. Instead, rinse your mouth with warm salt water, gently floss, or use over-the-counter pain medicine as directed. If the pain doesn’t go away, schedule an appointment with your dentist.

  • Root Canals Hurt

Root canals have a reputation of being incredibly painful, and that’s just not true. A root canal is needed when decay has progressed so much that it begins to infect the inside of the tooth. This is where all of the tooth’s roots live, which makes decay this severe very painful. Root canal treatment actually removes the infection and the pain. The procedure itself is done when the mouth is numb, so it’s completely painless.

  • Brushing Harder Removes More Plaque

Logically, it makes sense that brushing harder will mean a cleaner mouth. But in fact, brushing too hard can cause damage. A rough scrubbing with your toothbrush can damage tooth enamel, leaving teeth exposed to bacteria and at risk for decay. It can also damage gums, cause them to recede, and increase sensitivity.

  • Seeing a Dentist Isn’t Necessary Unless You Have a Problem

Even though it’s recommended that everyone visit the dentist twice a year, only about 64% of Americans between the ages of 18 and 65 have seen their dentist in the past year. A common belief is that you don’t need to go to the dentist if you don’t have a problem. However, regular checkups and cleanings are the best way to prevent a problem from ever occurring.

In order to maintain good oral health, it’s crucial to practice good habits such as brushing and flossing every day and seeing the dentist bi-annually. If it’s time for your dental checkup, schedule an appointment with our Lawrenceville dental office today.

canker soreWhile inconvenient and sometimes a little painful, canker sores are more annoying than they are concerning. But when canker sores pop up you may wonder what these ulcer-type spots actually are, what caused them in the first place, and how to treat them quickly and effectively. At our Lawrenceville dental office, we’re here to answer some of the most common questions about canker sores and provide you with some tips on how you can get some relief.  

What Are Canker Sores?

Canker sores are small sores that occur inside the mouth. They typically resemble a blister and are red, bumpy circles. Sometimes a canker sore can appear white or almost gray in color, too.  Although canker sores can sometimes be confused with cold sores, the main differences are that cold sores usually affect the outside of the lips or mouth and are contagious while canker sores are not.

Signs of a Canker Sore

  • Raised sores on the tongue, cheeks, or roof of your mouth
  • Some people experience a tingling or burning sensation before the canker sore even appears
  • Occasionally severe canker sores can be paired with a fever

What Causes Canker Sores?

The actual cause of canker sores is unknown, but there are few thoughts as to what may contribute to developing a canker sore. Some of those ideas include:

  • High stress
  • An injury such as biting your cheek
  • Spicy or acidic foods

If you can correlate a canker sore to something you ate, try to avoid that food or eat it in moderation.

How Do You Treat Canker Sores?

There is no cure for canker sores, only treatments to help alleviate discomfort while they run their course. Canker sores usually resolve on their own in a week or two. In the meantime, the most common treatment is using an over-the-counter numbing agent. Some dentists may also use a laser to help reduce the healing time.

Canker sores happen to all of us, but they’re typically nothing to worry about. However, if you notice sores that multiply or don’t see relief in more than three weeks, call your Lawrenceville dentist to schedule an appointment.

Of course, our dental office in Lawrenceville is always here to help with any other issues you might be having. We happily welcome new patients and would love to see you. Call to schedule an appointment today.

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