Is Asthma to Blame for Cavities?

woman reaches for asthma inhalerPeople with asthma know just how serious and scary of a disease it is. It causes airways to narrow, makes it hard to breathe, and can potentially be life-threatening. There is currently no cure, but there are advanced treatments and medications that can help keep airways open so more air can pass through. However, the team at our dental office in Lawrenceville knows that both asthma and the medicines used to treat it may lead to cavities.  

How Are Asthma and Cavities Linked?

The main symptom of asthma is difficulty breathing since the narrowing of airways restricts oxygen flow. Because of this, many people with asthma tend to be mouth breathers, simply because it’s a little easier to get the air they need. While this involuntary response allows asthma patients to catch their breath, it can result in dry mouth. Some of the most common asthma medications also can cause dry mouth as a side effect. When a mouth is too dry, there’s not enough saliva to keep the mouth moist, help neutralize acids, or wash away harmful bacteria. This means that all of the acid and bacteria left behind can wear away tooth enamel and cause tooth decay and cavities.  

How Can You Reduce Your Risk?

There are multiple things you can do to help minimize your risk of dry mouth and cavities caused by asthma or asthma treatment

  • Drink More Water. Choosing to drink water instead of juice or soda helps rehydrate your mouth and will help eliminate the dangerous bacteria and damaging acids. Make sure you’re drinking plenty of water throughout the day, every day.
  • Rinse Your Mouth. A quick rinse with water or fluoride mouthwash after taking asthma medication or using an inhaler will wash away some of the drying ingredients so they’re not left lingering around for a long time. The sooner you can rinse, the better.
  • Brush Well, Brush Often. One of the best ways you can protect your teeth against dry mouth and cavities is to brush your teeth every day. A good brushing for two minutes in the morning and again at night removes food particles that may still be lingering around and washes away bacteria that have built up throughout the day. It’s also important to floss once a day to get the parts of your teeth a toothbrush just can’t reach.
  • See Your Dentist in Lawrenceville Regularly. While it’s important for everyone to go to the dentist at least twice a year, it’s particularly important for those with asthma. These visits help us thoroughly remove any plaque buildup and allow for early diagnosis and treatment of any issues that may have popped up.

Your care team at our Lawrenceville dental office is dedicated to keeping you healthy and encourages you to talk to us about your health history and medication use so we can get an accurate picture of your overall health and understand what may be affecting your oral health. If you have any questions or if there’s anything we can do to help keep you relaxed during visits, just let us know.

women cyclingIn just a few days we’ll celebrate National Women’s Health Week which kicks off appropriately on Mother’s Day, May 13th. This seven day celebration serves to raise awareness of the importance of following healthy habits for women of all ages. At our dental office in Lawrenceville, we know that dental health is an important part of overall health, and there are certain areas of oral health that specifically affect women throughout different phases of life.

Women’s Oral Health Priorities Change Over Time

As bodies change, chemistry throughout the body tends to change too. This includes the mouth. Since women experience hormonal changes at various times in their life, they actually have more oral health concerns to worry about, particularly during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, and menopause.

Puberty

Typically puberty in girls begins between 8 and 14 years old. Girls will experience quite a transformation during this time since a lot is happening inside their bodies. Hormone levels fluctuate and these hormones, including estrogen and progesterone, can affect oral health. Both estrogen and progesterone increase blood flow to the gums which may cause them to become inflamed, red, and sore. Bacteria in the mouth can also build up easier, increasing the risk for cavities and gum disease.

Menstruation

Just as during puberty, hormone levels continue to ebb and flow throughout a women’s childbearing years. Gums may still become sore or perhaps bleed when brushing or flossing close to when a period is about to begin. Some women may even experience a canker sore during this time. During menstruation, it’s also common to experience a decrease in saliva production, which will make a mouth feel dry and can potentially cause the breath to smell bad.

Pregnancy

Another time in a woman’s life when hormones and dental health changes is during pregnancy. Since about half of all pregnant women will get pregnancy gingivitis, dental care is especially important. What’s more is that poor dental health during pregnancy has been associated with premature babies, gestational diabetes, and preeclampsia. It’s recommended that pregnant women visit their dentist in Lawrenceville during the second trimester.

Menopause

During menopause women’s estrogen levels drop… which is directly related to bone loss. Women who have gone through menopause are aware of the risks associated with bone loss and are most commonly concerned with osteoporosis. While osteoporosis leads to brittle bones, it can also decrease bone density in the jaw increasing the risk of tooth loss. There are several ways dentists can replace these lost or damaged teeth, including dental implants and dentures.

Our Lawrenceville dental office is here to care for all of our patients during every stage of life. If you’re experiencing changes in your oral health, or if it’s been awhile since you’ve seen a dentist, there’s no better time than now to schedule an appointment. Give us a call today!

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